Tag Archives: steve jobs

Ballmer Bites Back, Disses the iPad

Ladies and gentlemen, step up to the ring: We’ve got a good old-fashioned Microsoft-Apple battle a-brewin’.

In one corner, you have Steve Jobs, the turtleneck-loving, porn-hating Apple CEO who says the “post-PC era” is upon us.

In the other, you have Steve Ballmer, the “developers!”-chanting, fancy-dancing Microsoft boss who likens Jobs’ vision of technology to an elitist fantasy.

This week, the two forces indirectly clashed onstage at The Wall Street Journal’s D8 conference in Southern California. And, suffice it to say, some colorful comments ensued — comments that, depending upon whose side you believe, could foreshadow some interesting things for the future of business computing. After all, as conventional wisdom goes, Apple has a legacy of downplaying the business market that Microsoft has courted for 30 years.

Steve vs. Steve: PCs, iPads, and the Future of Computing

First, the background: The Microsoft-Apple argument started when Jobs took the stage at D8 on Tuesday. Speaking with the Journal’s Walt Mossberg and Kara Swisher, Jobs delivered the sure-to-be-eternally-quoted line: “PCs are going to be like trucks.”

(It’s safe to say he didn’t mean they’d be powerful and reliable — you know, “like a rock.”)

Jobs went on to elaborate, suggesting that PCs would always be around but would eventually be used only by “one out of ‘x’ people” — leaving it up to you to fill in the ominous variable.

“This transformation’s going to make some people uneasy,” Jobs said. “People from the PC world.”

Ballmer’s D8 Rebuttal

Fast-forward to Thursday, when Steve Ballmer got his turn up on the D8 stage. Ballmer contradicted Jobs’ remarks, declaring that the age of the PC was anything but over.

“I think people are going to be using PCs in greater and greater numbers for many years to come,” he said. “There may be a reason why they call them ‘Mack Trucks,’ but Windows machines are not going to be trucks — they’re not.”

Ballmer went on to knock the idea of owning a different device for every purpose — say, an iPad for the road, an iPhone for the pocket, and an iMac for the home — suggesting that such a concept might seem realistic within the “bubble” of a tech conference but would never prove feasible for the majority of consumers.

“I think there will exist a general purpose device that does everything you want, because I don’t think the whole world’s going to be able to afford five devices per person,” Ballmer said.

Finally, Microsoft’s main man directly dissed the iPad, saying the famed tablet itself was merely a “different form factor of PC” — and proceeding to take a jab at its practical uses.

“A guy tried to take notes on one in a meeting with me yesterday. That was fun,” Ballmer quipped. “The meeting didn’t go real fast.”

The Battle in the Business World

When it comes to mobile tech and business, both Ballmer and Jobs may soon be battling a common enemy. Apple’s iPad is sure to face stiff competition from the soon-to-hit onslaught of Android-based tablets, which will offer corporate decision-makers far more options in terms of both hardware and carriers (not to mention far fewer restrictions in terms of content and applications). The iPad, after all, is more geared for consuming than creating content. A true mobile road warrior needs a device that’s built for the latter.

For Microsoft, with its thus-far-tablet-free shelves, the bigger threat may be Google’s upcoming Chrome OS. The operating system, set to debut sometime in the fourth quarter of this year, will bring a lightweight, open source alternative to netbooks and potentially desktop PCs as well. And if Google’s able to get businesses on-board with its cloud-driven vision, Microsoft may be in for another serious fight.

For now, though, it looks like it’s tech’s oldest feud that’s taking center stage yet again. Ah, nostalgia.

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Steve Jobs intro’s the iPad – cnet

Apple CEO Steve Jobs debuts the much-anticipated Apple tablet. Jobs shows the in’s and out’s of the new “iPad”, starting at $499.



iBooks is born – watch out Borders !!!

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BlackBerry to drink with Apple maybe – Technology – smh.com.au

It may seem an unlikely union but at the launch of the BlackBerry Bold today, the company’s global COO Dennis Kavelman said he wanted to take Apple CEO Steve Jobs out for a drink.

The Bold, soon to be sold by Optus, Telstra and Vodafone, will compete directly with Apple’s iPhone as BlackBerry-maker RIM seeks to expand its reach from executives and senior employees to pretty much anyone with a professional job.

Bold step for BlackBerry – Technology – smh.com.au

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Is the MacBook Air Really the technological marvel – or just airport security staff menace – itsReal

This MacBook Air blog post is entertaining so i have repeated it here – Is the MacBook Air Really the technological marvel – or  just airport security staff menace

Steve Jobs Made Him Miss His Flight

On waking, I reach for my blackberry. It tells me what city I’m in; the hotel rooms offer no clues. Every Courtyard by Marriott is interchangeable.  Many doors into the same house. From the size of my suitcase, I can recall the length of my stay: one or two days, the small bag.  Three or four, the large. Two bags means more than a week.

CNBC, shower, coffee, email. Quick breakfast, $10.95 (except in California, where it’s $12.95. Another clue.)

Getting there is the worst part. Flying is an endless accumulation of indignities. Airlines learned their human factors from hospitals. I’ve adapted my routine to minimize hassles.

Park in the same level of the same ramp. Check in at the less-used kiosks in the transit level. Check my bag so I don’t have to fuck around with the overhead bins. I’d rather dawdle at the carousel than drag the thing around the terminal anyway.

Always the frequent flyer line at the security checkpoint. Sometimes there’s an airline person at the entrance of that line to check my boarding pass, sometimes not. An irritation. I’d rather it was always, or never. Sometimes means I don’t know if I need my boarding pass out or not.

Same words to the TSA agent.  Standard responses. “Doing fine,” whether I am or not.  Same belt.  It’s gone through the metal detector every time. I don’t need to take it off.

Only… today, something is different. Instead of my bags trundling through the x-ray machine, she stops the belt.  Calls over another agent, a palaver. Another agent flocks to the screen. A gabble, a conference, some consternation.

They pull my laptop, my new laptop making its first trip with me, out of the flow of bags. One takes me aside to a partitioned cubicle. Another of the endless supply of TSA agents takes the rest of my bags to a different cubicle. No yellow brick road here, just a pair of yellow painted feet on the floor, and my flight is boarding. I am made to understand that I should stand and wait.  My laptop is on the table in front of me, just beyond reach, like I am waiting to collect my personal effects after being paroled.

I’m standing, watching my laptop on the table, listening to security clucking just behind me. “There’s no drive,” one says. “And no ports on the back. It has a couple of lines where the drive should be,” she continues.

A younger agent, joins the crew. I must now be occupying ten, perhaps twenty, percent of the security force. At this checkpoint anyway. There are three score more at the other five checkpoints. The new arrival looks at the printouts from x-ray, looks at my laptop sitting small and alone. He tells the others that it is a real laptop, not a “device”. That it has a solid-state drive instead of a hard disc. They don’t know what he means. He tries again, “Instead of a spinning disc, it keeps everything in flash memory.” Still no good. “Like the memory card in a digital camera.” He points to the x-ray, “Here. That’s what it uses instead of a hard drive.”

The senior agent hasn’t been trained for technological change. New products on the market? They haven’t been TSA approved. Probably shouldn’t be permitted. He requires me to open the “device” and run a program. I do, and despite his inclination, the lead agent decides to release me and my troublesome laptop.  My flight is long gone now, so I head for the service center to get rebooked.

Behind me, I hear the younger agent, perhaps not realizing that even the TSA must obey TSA rules, repeating himself.

“It’s a MacBook Air.”  – Source: Wide Awake Developers

Recruit.net Asia’s largest job search engine will be launching a contest soon and the winner will get a MacBook Air – stay tuned 

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MacBook Air – its another winner from Apple – itsReal

 Everyone says I WANT the MacBook Air

Apple chief executive Steve Jobs took the wraps off a super-slim new laptop overnight, unveiling a tiny personal computer that is less than 2cm thick and turns on the moment it is opened.

At the Macworld Conference & Expo in San Francisco, Jobs also confirmed the tech giant’s foray into online movie rentals, revealing an alliance with all six major movie studios to offer films over high-speed internet connections soon after they are released on DVD.

Always a showman, Jobs unwound the string on a standard-sized manila office envelope and slid out the ultra-thin MacBook Air notebook computer to coos and peals of laughter from disbelieving fans at the conference.

macbook air

Steve Jobs  – Hero again

Full story: SMH

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